41 Movies Recommendations from Sean

I love movies. Since I’ve been little I’ve stayed up late watching them. Mad MaxFerris Bueller’s Day Off, Ghostbusters…I could go on and on. Movies are magical. They can inspire you, transport you to a different place or just make you laugh your ass off. Here are some that I love.


Lion (2016, PG-13) — A five-year-old Indian boy gets lost on the streets of Calcutta, thousands of kilometers from home. He survives many challenges before being adopted by a couple in Australia. 25 years later, he sets out to find his lost family.

Kubo and the Two Strings (2016, PG) — A young boy named Kubo must locate a magical suit of armor worn by his late father in order to defeat a vengeful spirit from the past.

Train to Busan (2016, NR) — While a zombie virus breaks out in South Korea, passengers struggle to survive on the train from Seoul to Busan.

Baked in Brooklyn (2016) — A guy decides to sell weed after losing his job, but things soon go out of hand as demand of business and paranoia starts taking over.

Chappie (2015, R) — In the near future, crime is patrolled by a mechanized police force. When one police droid, Chappie, is stolen and given new programming, he becomes the first robot with the ability to think and feel for himself.

Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck (2015) — An authorized documentary on the late musician Kurt Cobain, from his early days in Aberdeen, Washington to his success and downfall with the grunge band Nirvana.

John Wick (2014, R) — An ex-hitman comes out of retirement to track down the gangsters that took everything from him.

Journey to the West (2013, PG-13) — Tang Sanzang, an aspiring Buddhist hero tries to protect a village from three demons. He develops complex feelings for Miss Duan, the demon hunter who repeatedly helps him, and finally quests to meet the legendary Monkey King.

Holy Motors (2012, NR) — From dawn to dusk, a few hours in the shadowy life of a mystic man named Monsieur Oscar.

Safety Not Guaranteed (2012, R) — Three magazine employees head out on an assignment to interview a guy who placed a classified ad seeking a companion for time travel.

Fat Kid Rules the World (2012, R) — A dropout comes to the aid of a chubby and suicidal high-school kid by recruiting him as the drummer for his upstart punk-rock band.

Brooklyn Castle (2012, PG) — Amidst financial crises and unprecedented public school budget cuts, Brooklyn Castle takes an intimate look at the challenges and triumphs facing members of a junior high school’s champion chess team.

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry (2012, R) — A documentary that chronicles artist and activist Ai Weiwei as he prepares for a series of exhibitions and gets into an increasing number of clashes with the Chinese government.

The Art of Getting By (2011, PG-13) — George, a lonely and fatalistic teen who’s made it all the way to his senior year without ever having done a real day of work, is befriended by Sally, a popular but complicated girl who recognizes in him a kindred spirit.

Win Win (2011, R) — A struggling lawyer and volunteer wrestling coach’s chicanery comes back to haunt him when the teenage grandson of the client he’s double-crossed comes into his life.

Attack the Block (2011, R) — A teen gang in South London defend their block from an alien invasion.

Exit Through the Gift Shop (2010, R) — The story of how an eccentric French shop keeper and amateur film maker attempted to locate and befriend Banksy, only to have the artist turn the camera back on its owner.

Inside Job (2010, PG-13) — Takes a closer look at what brought about the financial meltdown.

Waiting for Superman (2010, PG) — Filmmaker Davis Guggenheim reminds us that education “statistics” have names: Anthony, Francisco, Bianca, Daisy, and Emily, whose stories make up the engrossing foundation of Waiting for Superman. As he follows a handful of promising kids through a system that inhibits, rather than encourages, academic growth, Guggenheim undertakes an exhaustive review of public education, surveying “drop-out factories” and “academic sinkholes,” methodically dissecting the system and its seemingly intractable problems.

Hesher (2010, R) — A young boy has lost his mother and is losing touch with his father and the world around him. Then he meets Hesher who manages to make his life even more chaotic.

3 Idiots (2009, PG-13) — Two friends are searching for their long lost companion. They revisit their college days and recall the memories of their friend who inspired them to think differently, even as the rest of the world called them “idiots”.

Home (2009) — With aerial footage from 54 countries, Home is a depiction of how the Earth’s problems are all interlinked.

District 9 (2009, R) — An extraterrestrial race forced to live in slum-like conditions on Earth suddenly finds a kindred spirit in a government agent who is exposed to their biotechnology.

Food, Inc. (2008, PG) — An unflattering look inside America’s corporate controlled food industry.

Slumdog Millionaire (2008, R) — A Mumbai teen who grew up in the slums, becomes a contestant on the Indian version of “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?” He is arrested under suspicion of cheating, and while being interrogated, events from his life history are shown which explain why he knows the answers.

Taken (2008, PG-13) — A retired CIA agent travels across Europe and relies on his old skills to save his estranged daughter, who was kidnapped on a trip to Paris to be sold into prostitution.

A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints (2006, R) — The movie is a coming-of-age drama about a boy growing up in Astoria, N.Y., during the 1980s. As his friends end up dead, on drugs or in prison, he comes to believe he has been saved from their fate by various so-called saints.

Children of Men (2006, R) — In 2027, in a chaotic world in which humans can no longer procreate, a former activist agrees to help transport a miraculously pregnant woman to a sanctuary at sea, where her child’s birth may help scientists save the future of humankind.

Once (2006, R) — A modern-day musical about a busker and an immigrant and their eventful week in Dublin, as they write, rehearse and record songs that tell their love story.

Shaun of the Dead (2004, R) — A man decides to turn his moribund life around by winning back his ex-girlfriend, reconciling his relationship with his mother, and dealing with an entire community that has returned from the dead to eat the living.

Crash (2004, R) — Los Angeles citizens with vastly separate lives collide in interweaving stories of race, loss and redemption.

Big Fish (2003, PG-13) — A son tries to learn more about his dying father by reliving stories and myths he told about his life.

Love Actually (2003, R) — Follows the lives of eight very different couples in dealing with their love lives in various loosely and interrelated tales all set during a frantic month before Christmas in London, England.

City of God (2002, R) — Two boys growing up in a violent neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro take different paths: one becomes a photographer, the other a drug dealer.

Traffic (2000, R) — A conservative judge is appointed by the President to spearhead America’s escalating war against drugs, only to discover that his teenage daughter is an addict.

Payback (1999, R) — Porter is shot by his wife and best friend and is left to die. When he survives he plots revenge.

American Beauty (1999, R) — Lester Burnham, a depressed suburban father in a mid-life crisis, decides to turn his hectic life around after developing an infatuation for his daughter’s attractive friend.

The Boondock Saints (1999, R) — Fraternal twins set out to rid Boston of the evil men operating there while being tracked down by an FBI agent.

Fight Club (1999, R) — An insomniac office worker and a devil-may-care soap maker form an underground fight club that transforms into a violent revolution.

Good Will Hunting (1997, R) — Will Hunting, a janitor at MIT, has a gift for mathematics but needs help from a psychologist to find direction in his life.

Trainspotting (1996, R) — Renton, deeply immersed in the Edinburgh drug scene, tries to clean up and get out, despite the allure of the drugs and influence of friends.

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